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Table of Content
25 June 2006, Volume 28 Issue 03
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  • Articles
    Micromorphological Study on Leaf Epidermis of Schizostachyum and Its Allies ( Poaceae: Bambusoideae)
    YANG Han-Qi- , Wang-Hong-, Li-De-Zhu-**
    2006, 28(03):  261-267. 
    Abstract ( 87 )   HTML ( )   PDF (1174KB) ( 8 )   Save
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    Micromorphological characters of leaf epidermis of 16 published species from Schizostachy um Nees and its allies
    ( including Melocanna Trin. , Pseudostachyum Munro, Leptocanna Chia et H. L. Fung and Cephalostachyum Munro)
    were examined by both light and scanning electron microscopies. The results indicated that the papillae forms and distributional
    patterns on the abaxial surface were taxonomically informative at the generic level. The characters of papillae did not
    support Schiz ostachyum sensu lato; meanwhile, it was supported that Melocanna, Pseudostachyum and Cep halostachyum
    were better to be treated as separate genera respectively. Furthermore, it seemed to be more appropriate to place Leptocanna
    chinensis and Schizostachyum sanguineum in Cep halostachyum; and to place Cephalostachyum pergr acile and C1 virgatum
    in Schizostachy um .

    Ethnobotany of Ghalegay, District Swat, Pakistan*
    Farrukh Hussain, Ilyas Iqbal, Mufakhirah Jan Durrani
    2006, 28(03):  305-314. 
    Abstract ( 51 )   HTML ( )   PDF (412KB) ( 11 )   Save
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    Ethnobotanical study of plants revealed that the local community of Ghalegy, District Swat, invariably uses 126
    species of 59 families for various purposes. Based on their traditional local uses, fifty- seven species ( 4512%) were classified
    as medicinal, forty-seven as fire wood ( 3713%) , forty- five as forage ( 3517%) , twenty- eight as honey bee species
    ( 2212%) , twenty- seven as vegetable species ( 2114%) , 25 as edible fruits ( 14 wild and 11cultivated) , thirteen as timber
    wood ( 1013%) , twelve as ornamental ( 91 5%) , eleven as furniture wood, ten as shelter and thatch makers
    ( 719%) , ten as fencing ( 719%) , five as poisonous ( 4%) , four as religiousPsuperstitious species, three species used
    in making hand sticks and wooden tools ( 21 4%) , three as utensil cleaner species ( 214%) , three as evil repellent and
    one as fish poisoning species. The area is in plant resources and traditional knowledge but it needs ecological management
    for its sustainability.